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  #71  
Old 01-04-2018, 08:49 AM
Witsend Witsend is offline
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Default Winter Salt belt cars

I don't like slush melting and dripping in my work area or on me but when dealing with some stuff it's good to let the cars you are working on thaw out overnight indoors.
Besides rust penetrant I found from experience there is a greater chance of freeing up stuck tube nuts on brake and fuel filter lines, by tightening down on the tube nut first before I try to loosen it. As far as some suspension arm and leaf spring bolts and nuts, I also like to try and tighten from the bolt side while holding the nut.The slight bolt torsion and stretch of the bolt within the metal sleeve clamped firmly between the frame or shackle is often enough to help free the rust bond between the bolt and sleeve and maybe save you cutting or a fiery morass of torching through a bushing where the sleeve is frozen onto the bolt and spinning inside the rubber.
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  #72  
Old 01-14-2018, 10:43 PM
Witsend Witsend is offline
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Default Make up for being Dipstick and post a tip trick on You Tube

No need to pull intake manifold off to change a broken dipstick tube on a 2009 Corolla 1.8L. Besides a new intake gasket you got to think about possibly have to dealing with fuel rail orings too. Alternator removal seemed to work just fine on a 2009. 1.8L
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFpo6KuClnQ
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  #73  
Old 03-12-2018, 05:10 PM
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Default I'm Not a Racist

I just believe God created us all different for His entertainment and sometimes a Chinaman Forward wheel bearing adapter set from Port Freight is better and quicker at seating wheel bearing and differential bearing races than my Old Honkey Tonk way of using a brass drift side to side.
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  #74  
Old 03-13-2018, 12:58 PM
Witsend Witsend is offline
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Default Tools where they belong

We all know they all belong in our tool box in the garage , but if you are creative , some times you can pull one over on the wife and she'll tolerate some in the kitchen.
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  #75  
Old 04-17-2018, 06:20 PM
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You know those sliding shims for mounting alternators and such. An easy way to pull them back to make installations easier is to use an over sized socket, a 8mm bolt and nut and tighten. This will give you some room to make your installation without squeezing.
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  #76  
Old 04-17-2018, 06:25 PM
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A quick way to make changing a starter on a Duramax a breeze is to loosen the exhaust clamp on the turbo down pipe and use a ratchet strap to pull the exhaust back. This will give plenty of room to get the starter through for removal and installation with out damaging any thing. A 2 hour booked job in less than 45 minutes. 08 Chevy 2500HD shown.
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  #77  
Old 04-17-2018, 06:37 PM
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To make it easier to slid a spring type hose clamp into place where you can not get on it squarely such as this Colorado thermostat, a little white lithium grease on the outside of the hose will make it slide much easier. Clean off when done.
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  #78  
Old 04-18-2018, 04:39 AM
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Bob

I just used your tip on the sliding alternator shim this morning and it worked GREAT! I had a Honda Odyssey that came in late yesterday needing an alternator replacement. I couldn't squeeze the new unit in last night, came in early to finish it up and saw your post. Two minutes and I had all the room I needed and no beating the new unit with a hammer

THANKS!
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  #79  
Old 04-18-2018, 06:22 PM
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Glad it worked out for you.

If you have a GM car or truck with a radio problem, damaged face plate or inoperative CD player you can save the programming hassle that goes with installing a used unit. The CD player or face plate can easily be changed out in a few minutes and just install the face plate or CD player from a donor unit and you can plug it in and it'll work with having to flash or unlock it. The ribbon cable unplugs and it's just a few small screws and some tabs.
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  #80  
Old 04-19-2018, 08:23 AM
Witsend Witsend is offline
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Default Control Arm Bushing Sleeves seized to bolts

Where I live these things cause me to lose my @ss on what otherwise should be gravy jobs.
Some times in the early stages of the rust beginning to bond the bolts inside the bushing sleeves, I'll hold the nut on the opposite end and attempt to tighten the bolt side in an effort to clamp the bushing sleeve tighter between the metal, but often that still does not work for me and I have to take a cutoff wheel, air chisel , razor blades , whatever to get as much of the rubber cut away before I start using the torch on the bare sleeves stuck to the bolts so I don't have a fiery dripping morass while working on my back. I try to avoid a trip to dealer to order new bolts and clean and reuse the original bolts when possible , however I would gladly toss away the heat weakened bolts and get new ones if it actually would work to take the oxy acetylene torch and heat the sh@t out of the heads of the bolts , allow things to cool , and then try to loosen the bolts again? Does that work often? I thought Bob mentioned trying that.
I am changing out the half dozen rear suspension arms( 3 on each side) of a 2006 Ford Focus that has weld nuts on the other ends and 4 of the bushing sleeves are seized to the bolts and seems to just want to start spool up the bushing rubber.
I hate bushing fires from torching as well as cutting wheel change outs and chiseling Any body know if putting heat on the bolt head really does makes a difference getting seized bushing sleeves to loosen their grip on the bolt ? I always figured it just take the strength temper out of the bolt and even snap off the bolts head after cooling. I've always cut arm off and surrounding bushing rubber away, then heat the steel bushing sleeve and drive bolt out or find a seam and split with a chisel. Where's a Crazy Scorched Bearded Jihadrodist when you need one?

Last edited by Witsend; 04-19-2018 at 01:35 PM..
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