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  #1  
Old 12-23-2016, 02:28 PM
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Default Practical Tips

I'm just starting this thread for showing old and new time and work saving general application TIPs.

This is the oldest trick in the book, but maybe your new to this. For getting the threads started or to remove hard to reach spark plugs a piece of rubber hose works well.
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Old 12-23-2016, 02:33 PM
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If your installing or removing inner tie rod ends that have a hex drive but have limited space to turn a full length wrench, ( Dodge, GM), a wrench from your fan hub removal set works well to speed things up once the old tie rod is loose or until final torque on the new one.
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Old 12-24-2016, 12:37 PM
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Default starting a siphon the easy way.

Ever have to empty a gas tank or get coolant out of a barrel and there's no pump handy. It's easy to start a siphon with your blow gun. Just use a 3/8th fuel line and cup the end of it a bit while pointing the air gun away from the end of the hose. The vacuum created at the end of the hose should be enough to get the fluid flowing. An easy siphon without the bitter after taste.
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Old 12-24-2016, 04:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greasybob View Post
Ever have to empty a gas tank or get coolant out of a barrel and there's no pump handy. It's easy to start a siphon with your blow gun. Just use a 3/8th fuel line and cup the end of it a bit while pointing the air gun away from the end of the hose. The vacuum created at the end of the hose should be enough to get the fluid flowing. An easy siphon without the bitter after taste.
Great tip! I'll definitely use that one.

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Old 12-27-2016, 07:31 PM
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Default ratchet straps

If you perform front end alignments, you'll notice that a lot of vehicles today have slotted holes for adjustment but don't come with the eccentric bolts or washers needed to make the adjustments. Often they are available from the parts stores for 20 bucks apiece on up, as high as $50 to $ 60 per side. Rather than spend the money and time to change these just loosen the bolts. The weight of the vehicle will usually force the control arm to move outwards. You can then attach a ratchet strap to pull the control arm back towards the center and tighten the bolt once it is in the correct position. Saving time and money.
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Old 12-28-2016, 07:05 AM
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Quote:
If you perform front end alignments, you'll notice that a lot of vehicles today have slotted holes for adjustment but don't come with the eccentric bolts or washers needed to make the adjustments. Often they are available from the parts stores for 20 bucks apiece on up, as high as $50 to $ 60 per side. Rather than spend the money and time to change these just loosen the bolts. The weight of the vehicle will usually force the control arm to move outwards. You can then attach a ratchet strap to pull the control arm back towards the center and tighten the bolt once it is in the correct position. Saving time and money.
Some older jeep products , but Not too many front wheel drive cars come to mind that give you slots in the front arms or subframe to give any provision for front camber caster adjust-ability that I can think of.
but the rear wheel toe is more common. Didn't know the manufacturers got cheap and took away the former Eccentrics. Guess it gonna have to take a determined Eccentric tech to have to say, If you don't find em , grind em .
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Old 12-28-2016, 02:16 PM
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I have seen suspension repairs completed using lengths of hard wood in place of suspension arms in the past, just then glancing at the picture I thought I was going to read about somebody fitting a ratchet strap in place of a suspension arm
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Old 12-28-2016, 02:52 PM
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Default Dirt cheap brake fluid recovery

Ingredients for recipe
1 discarded gallon window wash container (with cap)
26" of 5/32" vacuum hose

Drill one 5/16 hole through the center of the cap. and drill one 5/16 hole opposite the handle of the jug. Remove the cap and force vacuum hose through 5/16 hole, and then feed 3" extra. Thread 3" of extra vacuum hose through jug handle, then tighten cap back onto jug. Force other end of vacuum hose into other 5/16 hole opposite of handle on jug, this permits the residual used brake fluid to drain back into the jug. Once you get a pint or so of used brake fluid in the jug it really starts to stay put. Also, with the vacuum hose routed into the clear handle, you can get a good visual of the amount of air in the brake fluid stream while bleeding brakes. The 5/32" vacuum hose seems to fit most bleeders snug, freeing up both hands to operate the bleeder wrench and/or caliper collapse tool. I am a low volume shop so the gallon container lasts me a little over a year.
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Old 12-29-2016, 08:11 AM
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That's pretty cool. You could always put some old small nuts and bolts in the bottom of the jug to give some ballast when it's empty.
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Old 12-29-2016, 04:41 PM
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This is an old one but maybe you haven't seen it yet. To improve the control you have with your flex sockets, especially when at the end of a long extension, wrap the joint with a couple rounds of black electric tape.
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